Legislative Update

I hosted a Northwest Oklahoma Conservation tour Friday, March 20, with former state Rep. Clay Pope. The idea was to educate urban legislators about the direct impacts from conservation efforts in rural Oklahoma. Appropriations Chair, Representative Ken Miller, of Edmond attended the tour. He was pleasantly surprised by the projects we visited. The tour was such a success that we are already planning stages of hosting another before the end of session.

I was also happy to see conservation folks up at the Capitol this week. In particular, I would like to recognize Blaine and Dewey counties. Blaine County stopped by the office and Dewey County hosted an informational booth in the rotunda. The more awareness we can raise about conservation efforts, the better.

In past columns, I mentioned a bill of mine that passed and would increase the amount of reimbursable funds for county road and bridge projects from $200,000 to $400,000. The legislation would streamline county projects by allowing them to finish larger projects before getting the money from the state. Well, I am also happy to carry a similar Senate bill, by state Sen. Mike Schulz. Having the two measures doubles the odds of getting one of them passed into law.

We are gearing up to hear a number of important Senate bills in the Agriculture and Rural Development Committee. One bill would protect farms and ranches from frivolous lawsuits, allowing farms and ranches being pulled into the court to be reimbursed their legal expenses if the lawsuit is found to be frivolous. Another bill by state Sen. Ron Justice would increase the fertilizer inspection fee by 35 cents to help fund research into soil fertility to benefit all Oklahoma agricultural producers.

In the Energy and Utility Regulation Committee, I will be looking at Senate bills such as one that would allow municipalities to expand funds to help conserve electricity or natural gas and therefore cut down on the costs on running the municipality. Another Senate bill would ban the Corporation Commission from accepting agreements to drill, operate or plug wells from entities that have been found in violation of the commission’s rulings. There are close to 20 bills currently referred to the committee.

As always, I would love to hear from you. I can be reached at the Capitol at (405) 557-7407.
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Legislative Update

Before getting into current legislation, I would like to begin this column by reporting that Oklahoma’s education ranking has improved.

To our educators’ credit, we have jumped from a near-bottom ranking in education to 35th. The new ranking was part of the American Legislative Exchange Council’s 15th edition of its Report Card on American Education. Not only has our ranking improved but we are now ahead of the curve in two areas – our teacher-to-pupil ratio and the graduation rate of our high school students. The report should make all Oklahomans proud.

It was the focus of legislators this week to make sure federal stimulus dollars were not going to be used in an inappropriate way by state agencies.

Senate Concurrent Resolution 13 was passed by both the state House and the state Senate. It requires state agencies that receive federal stimulus funds to submit a plan for the expenditure of such funds to the chairmen of the House and Senate appropriations committees and the governor’s office.

The resolution also states that an agency cannot spend the federal funds without additional dollars being accounted for in the state agency’s budget limits put into law every legislative session. Each year, a budget limitation bill is passed for each agency to show legislative intent in the expenditure of appropriated funds.

It is my belief that we need as much oversight over these federal dollars as we can to ensure taxpayers are adequately protected.

Another important resolution states that the Oklahoma Legislature is opposed to the National Popular Vote Interstate Compact and believes that the Electoral College system is the best way to decide elections. Our Founding Fathers set up the Electoral College system in order to allow all states, no matter their populations, to have a say in who was elected. The bill is authored by a former history teacher and I believe it protects a system that was set up for a very good reason – namely that all regions of the country would have certain amount of sway as to who is elected to represent our country.

I was a proud supporter of the resolution, which passed despite 35 members who opposed it. The National Popular Vote Interstate Compact was dreamed up by those who were not happy that George W. Bush was elected over Al Gore despite not having the majority of the popular vote. There will always be those who want to change our country’s laws because of some perceived wrong but I believe we must decide based on what is best for our country.

I would also like to mention a productive meeting I had with Mayor Wes Hardin, City Manager Tiffany Tillman and Curtis Turner, all of Hennessey, and Department of Environmental Quality Director Steve Thompson. They all addressed questions I had about the wastewater system.

As always, I would love to hear from you. I can be reached at the Capitol at (405) 557-7407.
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Legislative Update

I have a special place in my heart for the men and women who defend our freedoms. As someone who witnessed firsthand the terrible tragedy of Sept. 11, 2001, I thank them for their efforts on behalf of our country.

I am pleased to co-author a bill that passed unanimously to allow the families of fallen military servicemen and women to attend Oklahoma colleges and universities for free. The bipartisan bill would provide in-state tuition waivers to the dependents of Oklahoma military servicemen and women killed in the line of duty for up to 48 months.

On Friday, March 6, state Sen. Bryce Marlatt and I toured Dewey County to survey the damage caused by the wild fire. County officials led the tour of the thousands of acres of damage that were burned, causing the Oklahoma Highway Patrol to shut down U.S. Highway 183 between Putnam and Taloga because of the smoke. I was proud to hear of the efforts of local firefighters from several departments to contain the fire and would like to thank them on behalf of my constituents who benefitted from their protection.

I also recently met some young but very creative constituents from the Kingfisher Regional Hospital Student Governing Board. I was impressed by their approach in generating some new legislative ideas and will be looking for ways to implement those ideas. Hospital administrator Damon Benson and Rachel Cameron, School Nurse for Kingfisher Public Schools, led the group that included Robert Walker and Bryce Crawford of Kingfisher, Katie Beebe of Okarche and Nikki Bomhoff of Okarche, and Evan Shimanek and Callan Bregenzer of Hennessey.

Meanwhile, House legislators continue to pass a number of reforms meant to improve the quality of state government services in Oklahoma. One, which I believe is especially important, concerns Oklahoma’s Department of Human Services. The department has come under fire for not doing enough to keep Oklahoma families together. An extensive audit showed many ways to improve how the state handles child abuse and neglect reports. Following recommendations of the audit, the House passed a bill that would require law enforcement to consult with DHS before removing a child and would create a program to allow information about a child’s physical and behavioral health and education needs to be available electronically. The bill would also phase out public shelters and establish a centralized statewide hotline for reports of child abuse and neglect.

The loopholes that have allowed lawbreaking politicians to retain their taxpayer-funded benefits were addressed in the House this week. The legislation was passed with former state Sen. Gene Stipe in mind. The former legislator was allowed to keep his benefits despite having committed a felony because he did not get convicted while in office. I am proud to say that I voted with other legislators to close these loopholes.

As always, I would love to hear from you. I can be reached at the Capitol at (405) 557-7407.
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Legislative Update

I have a special place in my heart for the men and women who defend our freedoms. As someone who witnessed firsthand the terrible tragedy of Sept. 11, 2001, I thank them for their efforts on behalf of our country.

I am pleased to co-author a bill that passed unanimously to allow the families of fallen military servicemen and women to attend Oklahoma colleges and universities for free. The bipartisan bill would provide in-state tuition waivers to the dependents of Oklahoma military servicemen and women killed in the line of duty for up to 48 months.

On Friday, March 6, state Sen. Bryce Marlatt and I toured Dewey County to survey the damage caused by the wild fire. County officials led the tour of the thousands of acres of damage that were burned, causing the Oklahoma Highway Patrol to shut down U.S. Highway 183 between Putnam and Taloga because of the smoke. I was proud to hear of the efforts of local firefighters from several departments to contain the fire and would like to thank them on behalf of my constituents who benefitted from their protection.

I also recently met some young but very creative constituents from the Kingfisher Regional Hospital Student Governing Board. I was impressed by their approach in generating some new legislative ideas and will be looking for ways to implement those ideas. Hospital administrator Damon Benson and Rachel Cameron, School Nurse for Kingfisher Public Schools, led the group that included Robert Walker and Bryce Crawford of Kingfisher, Katie Beebe of Okarche and Nikki Bomhoff of Okarche, and Evan Shimanek and Callan Bregenzer of Hennessey.

Meanwhile, House legislators continue to pass a number of reforms meant to improve the quality of state government services in Oklahoma. One, which I believe is especially important, concerns Oklahoma’s Department of Human Services. The department has come under fire for not doing enough to keep Oklahoma families together. An extensive audit showed many ways to improve how the state handles child abuse and neglect reports. Following recommendations of the audit, the House passed a bill that would require law enforcement to consult with DHS before removing a child and would create a program to allow information about a child’s physical and behavioral health and education needs to be available electronically. The bill would also phase out public shelters and establish a centralized statewide hotline for reports of child abuse and neglect.

The loopholes that have allowed lawbreaking politicians to retain their taxpayer-funded benefits were addressed in the House this week. The legislation was passed with former state Sen. Gene Stipe in mind. The former legislator was allowed to keep his benefits despite having committed a felony because he did not get convicted while in office. I am proud to say that I voted with other legislators to close these loopholes.

As always, I would love to hear from you. I can be reached at the Capitol at (405) 557-7407.
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Legislative Update

This week, I am happy to report that my colleagues have passed a number of pieces of legislation I authored.

The bill that I am most proud of is one that would make agricultural tracts of land that have been annexed into a city exempt from having to follow laws passed by that city. There is already an exemption of that kind in Oklahoma law but only for tracts of land annexed into a city on or before July 1, 2003. My bill takes into account the fact that there are tracts that were annexed before that 2003 date that should clearly enjoy the same exemption. This is a common-sense protection for landowners to ensure they do not lose the use of their property if the city arbitrarily annexes it.

My bill got quite a bit of debate as there are cities that feel threatened by it. But as there are a number of representatives from rural districts such as my own, I am happy to report to you that it passed 63-34 with support from most rural representatives, both Democrat and Republican.

Another of my bills would increase the amount county governments can reward an individual for providing information leading to the arrest and conviction of someone who has defaced county property. My bill gives the county the ability to reward an individual up to $1,000 and the authority to create a fund not to exceed $2,000 from which to draw the reward from. This bill was passed unanimously.

A bill I authored to support our American Legion Posts by giving them all tax-exempt status passed out of the House Appropriations and Budget Committee unanimously. American Legion Posts have long served our communities and I thought it only right that they be given a tax exemption status, like so many other groups in Oklahoma enjoy.

Another of my bills that passed out of committee is very important to the state’s continuing efforts to maintain and repair our roads and bridges. It increases the amount of reimbursable funds for road projects from $200,000 to $400,000. This allows counties to get the work done and then request to be reimbursed.

I have mentioned before my fondness for former President Ronald Reagan. It is my pleasure to announce that I was able to co-author a resolution celebrating “Ronald Reagan Day” that was passed by the House. I was also very proud to introduce my son, born on Reagan’s birthday, and my beautiful wife, Nellie, to the Legislature.

The House has also passed a piece of pro-life legislation that would prohibit doctors from performing an abortion if they know the abortion is being requested because of the unborn child’s gender. To request an abortion for the purpose of gender selection is heinous and I am pleased to note that only four legislators voted against it.

Several energy bills were passed this week as well. One would create training for green jobs and another would give tax credits to individuals and businesses that installed geothermal heating and air units in their commercial or residential buildings.

One last area of legislation that I would like to touch upon is a bill that would protect farmers from frivolous lawsuits. This bill adds agritourism as one of the areas of agriculture under which farmers would gain some immunity from liability.

As you can see, it has been a very productive week at the Legislature.

As always, I would love to hear from you. I can be reached at the Capitol at (405) 557-7407.
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Sanders Appointed to Energy Council

OKLAHOMA CITY— House Speaker Chris Benge announced today that state Rep. Mike Sanders has been appointed to serve as a member of the Energy Council.

“I am very honored that Speaker Benge has appointed me to an important position having potential for such positive outcomes for this state,” said Sanders, R-Kingfisher. “Oil and gas issues are perhaps more vital to Oklahoma’s economy than in any other state—it has possibility for such an economic boom. I look forward to working with the council, serving on the House Energy and Utility Regulation Committee, and representing our state, which is leading the way in developing new energy technologies and environmental policies.”

The Energy Council is a non-profit organization formed in 1975 that promotes national energy strategies and environmental policies. The Council also endeavors to promote an understanding of energy and its role in the global economy and environment and to assist legislators in their policymaking efforts in their respective states.
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Sanders Passes First Bill

OKLAHOMA CITY – State Rep. Mike Sanders achieved his first legislative success today when the House voted to approve his House Bill 1467.

“I am very pleased to see my first bill pass easily and with no debate,” Sanders, R-Kingfisher, said. “House Bill 1467 is a common-sense measure that simply adds kindergarten through fourth-grade math teachers to those eligible for professional development through the Oklahoma Commission for Teacher Preparation.”

Professional development is crucial to ensure high education standards in Oklahoma, Sanders said.

“I think that professional development is one of the ways in which we ensure that our teachers are as prepared as they can be to educate our young ones,” Sanders said. “As a new father, I am even more watchful of ways to help enhance Oklahoma’s education system and am proud to see that education is a priority for my colleagues as well.”

House Bill 1467 was approved by a 98-2 vote. It now awaits a hearing in the Senate.
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Sanders Votes for Resolution to Keep Gitmo Terrorists Out of Oklahoma

OKLAHOMA CITY – State Rep. Mike Sanders voted for a resolution passed by the House Thursday that asks President Barack Obama and the U.S. Congress to refrain from relocating Guantanamo Bay terrorist detainees to Oklahoma prison facilities.

“I was in Washington, D.C. when the terrorists of 9/11 pulled off their cowardly attack on innocent civilians,” Sanders, R-Kingfisher, said. “I am appalled at the idea that terrorists with much of the same mentality as those 9/11 terrorists would be placed in an Oklahoma prison facility. There is no doubt in my mind that my constituents are not interested in having terrorists here in Oklahoma.”

House Resolution 1008, by state Rep. T.W. Shannon, requests that Guantanamo Bay terrorist detainees not be transferred to any prison facility in Oklahoma and specifically mentions the Federal Correctional Institution in El Reno, the Fort Sill Regional Confinement Center and the Federal Transfer Center in Oklahoma City. It cites a concern that Oklahoma by housing terrorist detainees could become a terrorist target in the future.

“Our men and women of the Armed Services have bravely stepped up to wage this War on Terror,” Sanders said. “I would not have them worry about their loved ones here at home.”

House Resolution 1008 was approved by an 81-12 vote. It now awaits a hearing in the Senate.
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Legislative Update

This week, I am happy to report that my colleagues have passed a number of pieces of legislation I authored.

The bill that I am most proud of is one that would make agricultural tracts of land that have been annexed into a city exempt from having to follow laws passed by that city. There is already an exemption of that kind in Oklahoma law but only for tracts of land annexed into a city on or before July 1, 2003. My bill takes into account the fact that there are tracts that were annexed before that 2003 date that should clearly enjoy the same exemption. This is a common-sense protection for landowners to ensure they do not lose the use of their property if the city arbitrarily annexes it.

My bill got quite a bit of debate as there are cities that feel threatened by it. But as there are a number of representatives from rural districts such as my own, I am happy to report to you that it passed 63-34 with support from most rural representatives, both Democrat and Republican.

Another of my bills would increase the amount county governments can reward an individual for providing information leading to the arrest and conviction of someone who has defaced county property. My bill gives the county the ability to reward an individual up to $1,000 and the authority to create a fund not to exceed $2,000 from which to draw the reward from. This bill was passed unanimously.

A bill I authored to support our American Legion Posts by giving them all tax-exempt status passed out of the House Appropriations and Budget Committee unanimously. American Legion Posts have long served our communities and I thought it only right that they be given a tax exemption status, like so many other groups in Oklahoma enjoy.

Another of my bills that passed out of committee is very important to the state’s continuing efforts to maintain and repair our roads and bridges. It increases the amount of reimbursable funds for road projects from $200,000 to $400,000. This allows counties to get the work done and then request to be reimbursed.

I have mentioned before my fondness for former President Ronald Reagan. It is my pleasure to announce that I was able to co-author a resolution celebrating “Ronald Reagan Day” that was passed by the House. I was also very proud to introduce my son, born on Reagan’s birthday, and my beautiful wife, Nellie, to the Legislature.

The House has also passed a piece of pro-life legislation that would prohibit doctors from performing an abortion if they know the abortion is being requested because of the unborn child’s gender. To request an abortion for the purpose of gender selection is heinous and I am pleased to note that only four legislators voted against it.

Several energy bills were passed this week as well. One would create training for green jobs and another would give tax credits to individuals and businesses that installed geothermal heating and air units in their commercial or residential buildings.

One last area of legislation that I would like to touch upon is a bill that would protect farmers from frivolous lawsuits. This bill adds agritourism as one of the areas of agriculture under which farmers would gain some immunity from liability.

As you can see, it has been a very productive week at the Legislature.

As always, I would love to hear from you. I can be reached at the Capitol at (405) 557-7407.
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Legislative Update

Since this is my first weekly column, I want to make sure that I introduce myself to those of you who I might not have met during my campaign to be your representative in the state House.

I am a conservative Republican and a native of Western Oklahoma. Having lived here most of my life, I have seen many ways in which our state government could be modernized to save your hard-earned dollars and many ways in which our laws could be updated to better serve the education, health care and infrastructure needs of rural Oklahoma.

But before I get into the many events occurring at your state Capitol, I’d like to introduce the newest member of the Sanders family. Davis Lee Sanders was born at 11:48 a.m. Friday, Feb. 6. My wife Nellie and I are overwhelmed, both physically and emotionally, to be parents – but we also feel truly blessed. Davis is a big boy, weighing 7 pounds and 15 ounces at birth.

I should also mention that Davis was born on the same day as a favorite president of mine, Ronald Reagan. I was inclined to change his middle name to Reagan, but Nellie was able to convince me that it was in my best interest to keep the name that we had already chosen.

As for the first weeks of the 2009 legislative session, legislators have moved several bills through committee that are worthy of our attention.

School Bills
Two important bills would give schools more flexibility and local control. One bill would change the annual requirement of 180 six-hour school days to 1,080 school hours. This would allow rural schools, which are sometimes hit a bit harder by winter weather conditions, to make up snow days without adding days to their calendar. Instead, schools could just extend the length of a few school days to make up for lost time. The other would leave it to schools to set their end-of-instruction test days rather than the state board of education. Both bills give credit to the notion that every school district in Oklahoma operates under unique conditions.

Rural Tax Exemption
Another bill I have been watching with interest is entitled the “Come Home to Oklahoma Act.” It consists of a five-year tax exemption for anyone moving from out-of-state to a rural county or town that has been losing population. This measure could help draw new residents to rural Oklahoma who would then pay sales and property tax that boosts our local schools and governments.

Livestock Regulation
In both the Senate and House, bills have passed out of committee that would streamline the regulation of livestock. It would place all regulatory authority solely with the Legislature. The idea behind the legislation is to protect ranchers from being annexed into a city and then subsequently subject to laws that would interfere with livestock operations. This has become a huge problem for producers across the country.

Gov. Brad Henry, in his State of the State, has called for cuts in the traveling expenses of a number of state agencies and a slight increase in funding for education. Meanwhile, in the state House, most bills await a hearing in one of the many committees before going on to the House floor.

I will keep you regularly updated on the activities of the Legislature through this column. As always, I would love to hear from you. I can be reached at the Capitol at (405) 557-7407.
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